Thursday, July 25

The Complete Adjective Table





Adjectives add detail, color, and flavor to our sentences. They help us express ourselves better. Without them, our sentences will be too simple and boring, and we won’t be able to explain which people or things we are talking about.



English is unique from other languages like Chinese and French. You can see it in the way English words are arranged inside English sentences.



Two of the most basic patterns of English are:



1. S + V + O


2. Det + Adj + N



What do they mean?



The first pattern means:


Subject + Verb + Object



If you compare English with your own native language, you will notice that the order is different. In another language, the Verb may come before the Subject, or the Verb and Object are switched.



But in English, you should always remember:



S + V + O



Now, let’s go to the second pattern:



Det + Adj + N


Determiner + Adjective + Noun



For example, you can say:



a beautiful girl = Ok

a handsome guy = Ok


You can’t say:


beautiful a girl = X

handsome a guy = X



Again, in other languages, the order can be different. Maybe the Adjective always comes after the Noun, not before it. Or some languages don’t use Determiners.



But in English, you should practice:


Det + Adj + N




What is a Determiner?



Adjectives and Nouns are very familiar to students, so it’s easy for them. But a Determiner can be a little confusing.



What is it?



Well, it’s easier to learn the Determiner by giving examples than by giving a definition. The best and most popular examples of a Determiner are:


a, an, the



As you might know, “a,” “an,” and “the” are Articles. Yes, Articles are one kind of Determiner.



But that’s not all. There are other kinds of Determiner. For example,



my, his, her, their, our, your, its



Possessive Pronouns. These Pronouns also belong to the group of Determiners.



What else?


this, these, that, those



They are called Demonstrative Pronouns. And they are Determiners too.



There are many kinds of Determiners. Aside from all our examples above, you can also use:



some, several, every, one, two, etc.



In summary,


Determiner



+
Adjective



+
Noun

a / an / the /
my / his / her / our /
their / your / its
this / these / that / those/
some / several / every /
one / two etc.





Please remember and practice this basic pattern in English.



You should make sentences like:


I know a tall guy. = Ok

Where is my blue notebook? = Ok

What do you think about that short dress? = Ok

I have one small problem. = Ok



Or,


The tall man is my uncle. = Ok

His new cellphone is expensive. = Ok

These yellow flowers are nice. = Ok

Several angry students are in the office. = Ok




What Should I Do 
If I Have Many Adjectives?



Yes, it’s easy enough to follow this pattern:  


Det + Adj + Noun



But what if you want to add more details, more description? Everybody knows that sometimes it’s better to be exact when explaining something. So sometimes, we have more than one Adjective.



Take a look:


the + blue, big, leather, old + bag


a + tall, Brazilian, slim, young + model



How do we arrange so many Adjectives?



Don’t worry. There’s a very practical formula for this situation. The formula is what I call “SSACOM.”



I call it this so it’s easy to remember.


S + S + A + C  + O + M



It means:



Size + Shape + Age + Color + Origin + Material



Nice, right?



So every time you want to use more than one Adjective, just think about our formula “SSACOM” and arrange them.



Like this:


S

S
A
C
O
M
Size

Shape
Age
Color
Origin
Material
How big?

What shape?
How old?
What color?
Where from?
What is it made of?



If we go back to our examples,



the + blue, big, leather, old + bag


a + tall, Brazilian, slim, young + model



We can put the Adjectives in the right order:


S

S
A
C
O
M
Size

Shape
Age
Color
Origin
Material
big


 old
 blue

leather
tall, slim


young

Brazilian



Finally,


the big, old, blue, leather bag = Ok


a tall, slim, young, Brazilian model = Ok



*Note: Adjectives expressing Length (ex. long, short, tall etc.) often come before Width (ex. fat, thin, wide, narrow etc.)




Opinion Adjectives



Wait! It’s not finished.



All of the Adjectives that we used in our examples above are what we call Fact Adjectives, which means that they talk about the outside appearance of a thing or person. Or what we can see or know as facts.



But sometimes we want to use Adjectives that are not 100% fact. Or, it might be true in your opinion, but you are not sure if other people will agree.



This is what we call “Opinion Adjectives.”



For example, “nice,” “beautiful,” “boring,” “delicious” etc.



So, we’ll add just one more in our formula:


Opinion Adjectives
Fact Adjectives


S

S
A
C
O
M
Size

Shape
Age
Color
Origin
Material
unusual
big


 old
 blue

leather
beautiful
tall, slim

young

Brazilian




the unusual, big, old, blue, leather bag = Ok


a beautiful, tall, slim, young, Brazilian model = Ok




The Complete Table of Adjectives




If we put all of our topics together, we have:





Warning



Even though you have an easy formula that you can use, please be careful with how many Adjectives you add to your sentence.



It’s true that it’s a good thing to be exact when we try to describe something or someone. But at the same time, you have to think about natural language.



It also depends on the situation, whether it’s in speaking or in writing, and what style.



There is no fixed and exact rule but, in general, if you put more than three Adjectives together, it will start to sound unnatural.  






Hope You Learned Something!

Keep on learning !









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