Tuesday, April 30

Bad Contractions





In my long experience with Korean and Japanese learners, I have noticed how both groups tend to shorten English expressions.



In other words, Japanese and Koreans like to make contractions.



A contraction means the shorter form of a word. For example:



are not ==> aren't


would have ==> would've


I will ==> I'll 

etc.



All the examples above are good. But the contractions that we are going to learn today are of a different kind. They are part of “Fusion English” or unusual English. So these contractions are actually wrong or not common.


image courtesy of stock.xchng



Now, I hope you don’t misunderstand. Each country in the world that doesn’t have English as its native language has its own Fusion English. We call these different versions of English like this:



Japlish = Japanese + English

Konglish = Korean + English

Chinglish = Chinese + English

Russlish = Russian + English

Germlish = German + English

etc.


Sound familiar?



Of course we can say that the local speakers “borrowed” the English expression and use it in their own style, but usually the local speakers have the wrong idea. They think that the expression that they use is original and common in English. But in fact, such an expression has already changed a lot and it's hard for an actual native speaker to recognize or understand.



In short, the meaning of the new expression is very far from the original. This can cause a lot of misunderstanding.



In the beginning of this post I mentioned Korean and Japanese learners. But other nationalities should also learn this because many “Fusion English” expressions have spread to other countries as well. You will find the same Fusion expressions in many different countries.





There are many kinds of Fusion expressions. We cannot discuss all of them in just one post. So, like I said, today we’re going to focus on bad contractions only.



Here is a short list of common bad contractions made by non-native speakers:




Japanese-English Fusion

Bad Contraction

Japanese
Original English
ice
アイス
ice cream

Ame foot
アメフト
American football

apart
アパート
apartment (US) ; flat (UK)

apo
アポ
appointment

buil
ビル
building

ball pen
ボールペン
(ballpoint) pen

depart
デパート
department store

en sto
エンスト
stall (car engine)

famicom
ファミコン
Nintendo Entertainment System (NES)

fami rest
ファミレス
family restaurant

front
フロント
reception desk

hamburg
ハンバーグ
Salisbury steak

han kerchie
ハンカチ
handkerchief or “hankie”

han st
ハンスト
hunger strike

house
ハウス
greenhouse or glasshouse

infla
インフレ
inflation

illust
イラスト
illustration

jea pan
ジーパン
jeans

love ho
ラブホ
love hotel

conveni
コンビニ
convenience store

concent
コンセント
power outlet

OL
OL
female office worker

machine
ミシン
sewing machine

all righ
オーライ
all right

auto bi
オートバイ
motorcycle; motorbike

pine
パイン
pineapple

perma
パーマ
perm

punc
パンク
flat tire

pan sto
パンスト
pantyhose

perso com
パソコン;
パーソナルコンピューター

PC
pro wrest
プロレス
pro wrestling

remo con
リモコン
remote

restru
リストラ
restructuring; downsizing

sand
サンド
sandwich

se frie
セフレ
friend with benefits

sex hara
セクハラ
sexual harassment

sha pen
シャープペンシル
mechanical pencil

CM
シーエム
TV commercial

soft
ソフト
software

soft cream
ソフトクリーム
soft serve

ska bo
スケボー
skateboard

super
スーパー
supermarket

st
ストライキ
strike

timely
タイムリー
clutch hit

televi
テレビ
TV

televi game
テレビゲーム
video game

tele ca
テレカ
prepaid card

toile
トイレ
toilet

wor pro
ワープロ
word processor

youn ex
ヤンエグ
young executive




Now, here are some Korean-English Fusion contractions. Like I said, some of them are the influence of Japan (you can see the similarities). English Fusion expressions travel across different countries…




Korean-English Fusion


Bad Contraction


Korean

Original English
apart
아파트
apartment (US) ; flat (UK)

machine
미싱
sewing machine

remo con
리모컨, 리모콘

remote
auto bi
오토바이
motorcycle; motorbike

di ca
디카
digital camera

sel ca
셀카
photographic self-portrait




In conclusion, please learn to avoid shortening English expressions unnecessarily.



It isn’t always true, but often and especially when it comes to shortened Fusion English, it’s much better to just say the complete original English word than to make a big mistake trying to cut the word.





Hope You Learned Something!

Keep on learning !









P.S. If you'd like to learn more Fusion English, especially based on the Japanese experience, just click this link













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