Friday, June 29

Nearby, Near, and SIRI






A screenshot of Google Maps





These days, there are all sorts of technology to help you know locations. Whether you’re using Apple maps or Google maps, finding yourself and your destination is as easy as the touch of a button. 



Or two.



If you’re equipped with the latest iPhone (4S and later), you probably have SIRI. With your own Artificial Intelligence assistant from Apple, you could try making the task even easier. Then you can get the information that you want at the speed of sound.



As fast as your own voice.



Although SIRI is really smart and can recognize your questions set in many different ways, all of them still have to be phrased using basic keywords like “Where’s the nearest____?” and “Find nearby____s?



You could always check that nobody can overhear you by doing this in the comfort of your house. But it would be a shame if people found out that you don’t know how to use a couple of very important words in English. 


In fact, it already is a shame if a robot like SIRI can speak better English than you. ;-)



image courtesy of stock.xchng



Having said that, let us proceed to our topic for today…





Nearby vs. Near




First of all, these two words might have the same meaning, but if you look at what Part of Speech (kind of word) they are, you will discover something:



Nearby = Adjective/ Adverb


Near = Preposition/ Adjective/ Adverb



Nearby” and “Near” can be both the same type of words (Adjective and Adverb) except one: a Preposition.



You will find a lot of confusing examples in your dictionary, but one easy way to tell the difference between our two words is: "Nearby" cannot become a Preposition.




To the eyes and minds of many learners, it’s the opposite: “Nearby” looks very much like a Preposition. This is because "Nearby" in fact consists of 2 Prepositions: “Near” and “By”.




Let’s discuss this in detail…





When you use "Near" as a Preposition, you always put a Noun after it. Like this:



Preposition + Noun


Near + Noun


Ex.


1.       I live near the station. = Ok


2.       Let’s go sit near the stage. = Ok


3.       It’s near the park. = Ok




You cannot use “Nearby” like this, as a Preposition:



1.       I live nearby the station. = X


2.       Let’s go sit nearby the stage. = X


3.       It’s nearby the park. = X





But you can use “Nearby” in other ways. For instance, as an Adjective:



1.       There’s a nearby station. = Ok


2.       He works at a nearby clinic. = Ok


3.       There’s a nearby park. = Ok





This is why it gets mixed up inside the learner’s mind. In the examples above, it’s true that “Nearby” is also followed by a Noun. But it functions as an Adjective; not as a Preposition.



Please remember and try not to mix the two: Near (Preposition) and Nearby (Adjective).




You can also use “Nearby” alone as an Adverb:


1.       I live nearby.


2.       You should swim nearby.


3.       There is a library nearby.






Last but not least, “Nearby” cannot be used as a Comparative Adjective while “Near” can:



Near – nearer – nearest = OK


Nearby – nearbier – nearbiest = X







These are all the reasons why you should ask SIRI



Where’s the nearest Mcdonald’s?” or “What is the closest ATM?” and “Are there any good Mexican restaurants nearby?”  









Hope you learned something!


;-)





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Tuesday, June 26

Onomatopoeia Online










Have you heard of “onomatopoeias?”



Onomatopoeiasare words that copy sounds. They don’t have any special meaning and they’re not normally used in everyday conversation.



But these days, they're sometimes used in online chats.




Onomatopoeias are interesting because when you learn any foreign language, you will see that the onomatopoeias of that language are very different from those of your native language, which are still different from those of another language.



For example, an American dog will make a sound like “bow wow” or “ruff-ruff” or “arf.” But in Japan, the same animal will say “wan-wan.” And in Korea, it will say “mong mong.”



A frog in America makes the sound of “ribbit.” But in Japan, it will be “kero kero.” In Korea, “gaegool gaegool.” And in France, “croac croac.”



The sound of light rain in America is also “pitter-patter” but in Japan it’s “para-para.”



images courtesy of stock.xchng




There’s no 100% explanation behind this mystery yet – except for the fact that onomatopoeias somewhat follow their mother language.



Anyway, it’s sometimes funny to compare the different onomatopoeias between two cultures. And, when you don’t have enough skill in the language you are learning, they can become a great source of entertainment.



Also, onomatopoeias may not be so commonly used in everyday conversation, but I have a feeling that they have a deep and basic connection to how each nationality perceives sounds differently. And they might hold the key to the chaotic Babel; to understand the countless languages of the world.




For a lighter and entertaining purpose, here is an incomplete list of different onomatopoeias across some of the languages of the world.





Have fun learning them!






Some Onomatopoeias

Across the World




English
Japanese
Korean
Russian
German
French
Chinese/Man.
Spanish
Italian
Baby crying
wah-wah
ogyaa 
おぎゃあ
eung'ae
eung'ae 응애-응애
ua-ua 
уа-уа
wäh-wäh
Ouin! Ouin!
wā wā 哇哇
buá buá
uè-uè
Biting
chomp, munch, 
om nom
musha-musha 
むしゃむしゃ

khrum хрум
mampf
miam



Burping
burp
geppu 
ゲップ
kkeo-eok 
꺼억

rülps
rot


rutt
Farting
poot, 
toot
bu 
ぶっ
bbung 
pook пук
pups
prout


prot
Food being eaten
yum yum, 
om nom nom
もぐもぐ 
(mogu mogu)
nyam nyam
 냠냠
njam-njam 
ням-ням
mampf mampf
miam miam

ñam ñam
gnam_gnam
Heart Beating
thump thump, 
ba boom, 
ba bump
ドキドキ 
(doki doki)
doogeun
doogeun
 두근두근
tuc-tuc 
тук-тук
ba-dumm, 
bumm bumm
bom bom, 
poum poum
pēng pēng 
怦怦
bum bum bum
tu tump
Hushing
hush, 
shh
shh 
しーっ

ts-s тс-с, 
sh-sh ш-ш, 
tsyts! цыц!
pst,
pscht
chut chut
shī 
chitón 
cht

Kiss
mwah, 
smooch
チュー 
(chū)
jjohk 
chmoc чмок
muah, 
schmatz
mouah, smack
boh
 
mua or muac, 
chuik
smac
Laugh
hahah, 
heh heh, 
hohoho,
(tee)heehee
ahaha 
あはは, フフ 
(fu fu)
hahaha 하하하, kekeke 케케케
haha 
хаха, 
hihi 
хихи, 
hèhè 
хехе
hahaha, hihihihi
hahaha
héhéhé
hihihi, hohoho
hā hā
哈哈,
hē hē 
呵呵,
xī xī 
嘻嘻
jajaja, 
jejeje
ah, ah, 
eh, eh, 
ih, ih, 
uh, uh
Scream
ow, 
ouch, 
yeow, 
yow, 
agh, 
eek, 
yikes
gyā 
ギャー
ah
 , 
aya 
아야
oy ой, 
ay ай, 
okh ох
au, 
aua, 
ah, 
autsch
aïe, 
ouille
āiyā 
哎呀
āiyō 
au, 
ay
ahi, 
ahia, 
ohi
Shriek

yagh, 
gah, 
eek, 
yikes
kyaa 
きゃあ

wi-i-i уи-и-и

(of pig)
uwah, 
waah, 
ieh




Sneeze
achoo!
ハクション! 
(hakushon!)
etchi 
에치
apchkhi! Апчхи
Hatschi!, Hatschu!
Atchoum
ā tì 
阿嚏
¡Achu!,
¡Achís!
or ¡Achú!
etciú
Snoring
zzz
gu-gu 
ぐうぐう

khrrr хр-р-р

Ron pchi
hū lu 


Swallowing
gulp
goku 
ごくっ
ggul gguk 꿀꺽
glyg глыг
schluck


glup
glu glu
Tooth brushing

ゴシゴシ 
(goshi goshi)
chi-ka chi-ka 
치카치카



shua 
¡chiqui chiqui!

Yawning
yawn
fuwaāa 
ふわあーあ


gähn
ouaaah









Hope you learned something!


If there are other onomatopeias from your native country that you would like to add here, kindly mention them in the Comments. Thanks!

Keep on learning !








This article uses material from the Wikipedia article <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross-linguistic_onomatopoeias">"Cross-linguistic onomatopoeias"</a>, which is released under the <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ph/">Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0</a>.










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