Monday, October 24

2 Kinds of Clauses: Noun and Adjective (Part 2)





Santa CLAUSE





Note: If you still haven’t read the first part of this post, kindly start with that by clicking this link:





Here are the answers to our previous exercise:


  1. I know that he is married. ==> Noun Clause

     
  2. I can't understand what they want. ==> Noun Clause

     
  3. I bought the bag that she likes. ==> Adjective Clause

     
  4. That fruits are healthy is a well-known fact. ==> Noun Clause

     
  5. I met the family who lives next door. ==> Adjective Clause




How? How do we know whether a Clause is a Noun Clause or an Adjective Clause?




Well, we can do this by looking at the role or the function that the Clause plays inside the sentence. If the Clause does the job of a Noun (if it acts like a Noun), then it’s a Noun Clause.



On the other hand, if the Clause does the job of an Adjective (if it acts like an Adjective), then it’s an Adjective Clause.



Like so:




  1. I know that he is married==> The Clause is the Object of the Verb “know.” It’s like a Noun.

     
  2. I can't understand what they want==> The Clause is the Object of the Verb “understand.” It’s like a Noun

     
  3. I bought the bag that she likes==> The Clause describes the Noun “bag.” It’s like an Adjective.

     
  4. That fruits are healthy is a well-known fact. ==> The Clause is the Subject of the Verb “is.” It’s like a Noun.

     
  5. I met the family who lives next door==> The Clause describes the Noun “family.” It’s like an Adjective.




It will take some practice before you can get used to Noun Clauses and Adjective Clauses. But through this exercise, you can see at a glance that this topic isn’t so complicated after all.



A Noun Clause is, in fact, just like a Noun. While an Adjective Clause is just like an Adjective!




Finally,



You might have noticed that 3 Clauses start with the Pronounthat” (#1, 3, and 4). Two of them are Noun Clauses (#1 and 4) while one (#3) is an Adjective Clause.



This means that a Clause that starts with the word “that” can be either a Noun Clause or an Adjective Clause. Like I said, it depends on what role or function the Clause plays inside the sentence.



However, a Clause that starts with the word “what” (only #2) cannot be used as an Adjective Clause.



This example is wrong:



I like the bag what you gave me. = X



Why? Why is this sentence wrong and impossible?




Because, in fact, there are two Nouns inside this sentence:



I like the bag  +  what you gave me.


Noun   +    Noun Clause



This is why we have to change the sentence. Just remove one of the two Nouns; either will be Ok:



I like the bag. = Ok


-- or –


I like what you gave me. = Ok



Lastly, you can also change the Noun Clause into an Adjective Clause:



I like the bag + that you gave me. = Ok
                         

                                      Noun + Adjective Clause



Please remember this important thing because our example sentence is a common mistake made by learners.




In summary, the “that” Clause can be either a Noun Clause or an Adjective Clause, but the “what” Clause can only be a Noun Clause.






Hope you learned something!

Keep on learning !















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